Strictly k-local automata, Theory of Computation

Strictly 2-local automata are based on lookup tables that are sets of 2-factors, the pairs of adjacent symbols which are permitted to occur in a word. To generalize, we extend the 2-factors to k-factors. We now have the possibility that the scanning window is actually longer than the augmented string. To accommodate that, we will permit factors of any length up to k as long as they start with ‘x' and end with ‘x' as well as k-factors which may or may not start with ‘x' or end with ‘x'.

So a strictly k-local automaton is just an alphabet and a set of stings of length k in which the ?rst symbol is either x or a symbol of the alphabet and the last is either x or a symbol of the alphabet, plus any number of strings of length no greater than k in which the ?rst and last symbol are x and x, respectively. In scanning strings that are shorter than k - 1, the automaton window will span the entire input (plus the beginning and end symbols). In that case, it will accept i? the sequence of symbols in the window is one of those short strings.

You should verify that this is a generalization of SL2 automata, that if k = 2 the de?nition of SLk automata is the same as the de?nition of SL2 automata.

Posted Date: 3/22/2013 1:20:24 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Strictly k-local automata, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Strictly k-local automata, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Strictly k-local automata Discussions

Write discussion on Strictly k-local automata
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
De?nition Deterministic Finite State Automaton: For any state set Q and alphabet Σ, both ?nite, a ?nite state automaton (FSA) over Q and Σ is a ?ve-tuple (Q,Σ, T, q 0 , F), w

How useful is production function in production planning?

design an automata for strings having exactly four 1''s

Generate 100 random numbers with the exponential distribution lambda=5.0.What is the probability that the largest of them is less than 1.0?


The Recognition Problem for a class of languages is the question of whether a given string is a member of a given language. An instance consists of a string and a (?nite) speci?cat


The class of Strictly Local Languages (in general) is closed under • intersection but is not closed under • union • complement • concatenation • Kleene- and positive

LTO was the closure of LT under concatenation and Boolean operations which turned out to be identical to SF, the closure of the ?nite languages under union, concatenation and compl

Rubber shortnote