Creating a table, PL-SQL Programming

Creating a Table

Syantax:

CREATE TABLE ENROLMENT

(StudentId SID,

Name   VARCHAR (30) NOT NULL,

CourseId CID,

PRIMARY KEY (StudentId, CourseId)) ;

Explanation:

  1. CREATE TABLE ENROLMENT announces that what follows defines a variable in the database, named ENROLMENT. A variable in an SQL database is necessarily a table variable, just as in a relational database every variable is a relation variable. SQL does not use the term variable, instead referring to the variable as a base table (its value being called a table, of course).
  2. StudentId SID defines the first column of ENROLMENT, giving its name and either its declared type (a user-defined type) or its domain-we cannot tell which. If SID is a domain, then the definition of that domain specifies the declared type of the column StudentId. Similarly, Name VARCHAR(30) and CourseId CID define the second and third columns of ENROLMENT, respectively. A system-defined type is explicitly given for the column Name but the remarks on the declared type of StudentId apply in similar fashion to CourseId. Note carefully that in SQL it is correct, in ordinary prose, to identify columns by their ordinal position. By contrast there is no such thing as "the first attribute" of a relation or a relation variable.
  3. NOT NULL, appended to the definition of Name, specifies a constraint to the effect that the table assigned to ENROLMENT cannot contain a row in which "the null value of type VARCHAR(30)" appears for that column. The constraint is needed for accurate emulation of Example 2.6 in the theory book because relational theory does not admit any counterpart of SQL's NULL (so nor does Tutorial D). See the next bullet for an explanation of why NOT NULL is not appended to the other two column definitions.
  4. PRIMARY KEY ( StudentId, CourseId ) specifies that at no time can two distinct rows appear in the current value of ENROLMENT having the same value for StudentId and also the same value for CourseId. In enterprise terms, no two enrolments can involve the same student and the same course. In addition, it implies that the NOT NULL constraint applies to each those two columns.
Posted Date: 1/18/2013 2:46:47 AM | Location : United States







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