What is lyophobic, Biology

What is lyophobic

If the affinity of the dispersed phase to go into or to remain in colloidal dispersion is slight, the dispersed phase is said to be lyophobic (solvent repelling) or hydrophobic when the medium is water. Oil dispersed in water as in the case of butter and margarine, is an example of a lyophobic system. Lyophobic colloids are mainly the aqueous dispersions of inorganic substances rarely recountered in food systems.  

 

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