Single phase full wave controlled rectifier , Electrical Engineering

Single Phase Full Wave Controlled rectifier

The single  phase  half  wave controlled  rectifier  produce only one pulse  of load  current  during  one cycle  of supply voltage. It  also  introduces a dc component into the supply  line which is undesirable because  it leads to saturation of the  supply  transformer and harmonics etc. The disadvantages of 1-? half  wave  converters are minimized by the use of 1-?  full wave  converters. This can be configured by two basic  type circuit midpoint type and bridge type.

Posted Date: 4/2/2013 8:22:36 AM | Location : United States







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