Pathophysiology and assessment of haemophilia, Biology

Pathophysiology 

The blood clotting mechanism occurs in three phases each dependent on preceding I phase. Due to the inherited deficiency of  factor VIII and or factor IX, there is alteration in the rate of  activation of  the intrinsic path way. As a result of  this, children show manifestation  of prolonged bleeding. I 

Assessment 

A  child with haemophilia presents with: 

i) Haemorrhage: You will see that even slight cut or bruise or minor trauma like a CI tooth extraction, injection, biting of tongue can induce extensive bleeding  in the child. Skin haemorrhages of various size and shape with raised, hard purplish black centres are characteristic. Bleeding can be  from the nose, mucous membrane of gums, lips and tongue, gastrointestinal system and kidney. 

ii)  Hemarthrosis: This is the hall mark of  the disease which occurs frequently in the elbows, knees and ankles. Joint bleeding can be a spontaneous event or can result from trauma. The affected joint is painful, warm and swollen. There may I be decrease joint motion and eventual joint degeneration owing to osteoporosis or muscle atrophy. There can be pallor proportionate to pre-existing anaemia and blood loss. , Diagnostic evaluation includes positive family history, manifestaton  of clinical  signs and symptoms, laboratory tests which  include  complete blood count, platelet function test, and clotting studies which show prolonged, partial thromboplastin time (PTT) and deficient levels of clotting factors. 

Posted Date: 10/27/2012 1:01:39 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Pathophysiology and assessment of haemophilia, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Pathophysiology and assessment of haemophilia, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Pathophysiology and assessment of haemophilia Discussions

Write discussion on Pathophysiology and assessment of haemophilia
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
What is the difference between the endocrine gland and the exocrine gland? Endocrine gland is a gland whose secretions (known as hormones) are collected by the blood and reach

Explain Ventilation (NIV)? This refers to the use of mechanical ventilatory support without the use of an endotracheal tube. NIV may be by the application of a continuous posit

DERMIS (CORIUM) - Mesodermal in origin. More developed part. Leather is obtained from dermis by tanning. Thinnest in eye lid. Connective tissue present. In it 4 types

Explain  the Techniques of Surgical Correction ? Techniques of Surgical Correction proximal Dissection (De Bakey type I and IZ or Stanford A) Monitoring lines are insert

Phylum Phytofagellata (Plant flagellates) 1) At some stage of life cycle they have one or more flagella. The flagella are used for locomotion. 2) Photosynthetic protistan

why green seeds reappeared in the f2 generation

Overcoming these difficulties is urgent. New instrumentation and measurement process, coupled with a developing computational infrastructure, give both a flood of data and the pro

Left Main Coronary Artery Disease (LMCAD) : Stenosis of 50 per cent or more of the left main coronary artery is an indication. If or surgery. Results of medical management are ver

Phases of Water The state of water can be changed from gaseous to liquid and liquid to solid and vice versa by the addition or removal of heat energy. To convert one gram of li

how many arrs are present in mataphasic telocentric chromosomes