Oregon productivity matrix - performance measures, Operation Management

Oregon Productivity Matrix - Performance Measures

The Oregon productivity matrix (OPM) was developed in Oregon State University in 1986 and measures accomplishments against goals. The OPM is seen as a grid in which different measurement categories are depicted vertically along the grid. Sub- goals and final goals are set horizontally. The following elements are important for the OPM's usefulness.

Firstly, it allows for multiple measurement categories where baseline and current performance levels are depicted. Secondly, it sets a goal level for each category to be achieved over a specified period of time with incremental sub-goals. Lastly, different goals are weighted according to their significance. The versatility of this tool is strengthened by the opportunity to include any desired goal with the underlying sub-goals and then weigh these according to their importance. By doing this, aggregate performance scores can be generated periodically and be used as an objective foundation for a performance management system.

Posted Date: 3/15/2013 2:32:43 AM | Location : United States







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