Named notation, PL-SQL Programming

Named Notation

The second procedure call uses the named notation. An arrow (=>) serve as the relationship operator that associates the formal parameter to the left of the arrow with the actual parameter to the right of the arrow.  Also the third procedure call uses the named notation and shows that you can list the parameter pairs in any order. And hence, you do not require knowing the order in which the formal parameters are listed.

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