Keyword and parameter description - cursors, PL-SQL Programming

Keyword and Parameter Description


This is a query which returns a result set of the rows. Its syntax is such that of select_ into_statement without the INTO clause.  When the cursor declaration declares the parameters, then each parameter should be used in the query.


This keyword introduces the RETURN clause that specifies the datatype of a cursor result value. You can use the %ROWTYPE attribute in the RETURN clause to give a record type that presents a row in the database table or a row returned by the formerly declared cursor. You can also use the %TYPE attribute to give the datatype of a formerly declared record.

The cursor body should have a SELECT statement and similar RETURN clause as its corresponding cursor specification. Also, the order, number, and datatypes of select items in the SELECT clause should match the RETURN clause.


This identifies a cursor parameter; which is, a variable declared as the formal parameter of the cursor. The cursor parameter can become visible in a query where a constant can appear. The formal parameters of the cursor should be IN parameters. The query can also reference the other PL/SQL variables within its scope.


This identifies a database table (or view) that should be accessible when the declaration is explained.


This identifies an explicit cursor earlier declared within the present scope.


This identifies a user-defined record formerly declared within the present scope.


This identifies a RECORD type formerly defined within the present scope.

Posted Date: 10/8/2012 5:55:16 AM | Location : United States

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