Graphics applications, Computer Graphics

The subsequent are also considered graphics applications as:

• Paint Programs: Permit you to create rough freehand drawings. The images are saved as bit maps and can simply be edited.

• Illustration/Design Programs: maintains more advanced features than paint programs, mainly for drawing curved lines. The images are commonly stored in vector-based formats. Illustration/design programs are frequently termed as draw programs.

• Presentation Graphics Software: This software lets you make bar charts, pie- charts, graphics and the other types of images for reports and slide shows. The charts can be depends on data imported from spreadsheet applications.

• Animation Software: Enables you to sequence and order a series of images to simulate movement. All images are like a frame in a movie.

•   CAD Software: Enables engineers and architects to draft designs.

  • Desktop Publishing: gives a full set of word-processing features and also fine control over placement of graphics and text, hence you can make newsletters, advertisements, books and the other types of documents.

Generally, applications which support graphics need a powerful CPU and a large amount of memory. Several graphics applications, for illustration: computer animation systems need more computing power and thus, run only on powerful workstations or particularly designed graphics computers. Similar is also true of complex 3-D graphics applications.

Additionally to the CPU and memory, graphics software needs a graphic monitor and support for one of the several graphics standards. Most PC programs, for illustration, needs VGA graphics. Occasionally this is inbuilt and sometimes it is add on characteristic.

The quality of most graphics devices is found by their resolution; how many points per square inch they can present and their colour abilities.

Images have better information content, both in terms of information theory (that is the number of bits needed to represent images and in terms of the sense that images can convey to the viewer. Due to the significance of images in any domain wherein complex information is manipulated or displayed and also due to the high expectations that consumers have of image quality, computer graphics have for all time placed heavy demands upon computer hardware and software.

In the year 1960s early computer graphics systems utilized vector graphics to construct images out of straight line segments that were combined for display upon specialized computer video monitors. Vector graphics is economical in it's utilize of memory, as an entire line segment is identified simply by the coordinates of its endpoints. Though, it is inappropriate for highly realistic images, as most images have at least several curved edges, and by using all straight lines to draw curved objects outcomes in a noticeable "stair-step" effect.

In the late year 1970s and '80s raster graphics, obtained from television technology, turned into more common, although was even limited to expensive graphics workstation computers. Raster graphics presents images through "bit maps" stored in the computer's memory and displayed upon a screen composed of tiny pixels. All pixels are represented through one or more memory bits. One bit per pixel suffices for black and white images, whereas four bits per pixel identify a 16-step gray-scale image. Eight bits per pixel identifies an image along with 256 colour levels; the so-called "true color" needs 24 bits per pixel that specifying more than 16 million colours. At such resolution or bit depth, a full-screen image needs several megabytes that is millions of bytes; 8 bits = 1 byte of memory. As the 1990s, raster graphics has turned into ubiquitous, personal computers are now normally equipped along with dedicated video memory for holding high-resolution bit maps.

Posted Date: 4/9/2013 2:33:31 AM | Location : United States







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