Formal language theory, Theory of Computation

This was one of the ?rst substantial theorems of Formal Language Theory. It's maybe not too surprising to us, as we have already seen a similar equivalence between LTO and SF. But it equates two very di?erent ways of specifying languages-ways that have almost nothing in common. The fact that these actually de?ne the same class of languages suggests that it is a "natural" class of some sort and not just an arbitrary class re?ecting the idiosyncrasies of the mechanisms we used. In wake Kleene's Theorem, the term Regular is uniformly used to denote both the languages that can be denoted by a regular expression and those that are recognized by FSA.

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