Formal language theory, Theory of Computation

This was one of the ?rst substantial theorems of Formal Language Theory. It's maybe not too surprising to us, as we have already seen a similar equivalence between LTO and SF. But it equates two very di?erent ways of specifying languages-ways that have almost nothing in common. The fact that these actually de?ne the same class of languages suggests that it is a "natural" class of some sort and not just an arbitrary class re?ecting the idiosyncrasies of the mechanisms we used. In wake Kleene's Theorem, the term Regular is uniformly used to denote both the languages that can be denoted by a regular expression and those that are recognized by FSA.

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LTO was the closure of LT under concatenation and Boolean operations which turned out to be identical to SF, the closure of the ?nite languages under union, concatenation and compl


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De?nition Instantaneous Description of an FSA: An instantaneous description (ID) of a FSA A = (Q,Σ, T, q 0 , F) is a pair (q,w) ∈ Q×Σ* , where q the current state and w is the p

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The class of Strictly Local Languages (in general) is closed under • intersection but is not closed under • union • complement • concatenation • Kleene- and positive