Finite languages and strictly local languages, Theory of Computation

Theorem The class of ?nite languages is a proper subclass of SL. Note that the class of ?nite languages is closed under union and concatenation but SL is not closed under either. Nevertheless, this does not contradict the fact that every ?nite language is SLk, for some k. All it says is that the counterexamples that establish non-closure of SL under union and concatenation must involve non-?nite languages. (You should verify the fact that they do.)

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