Block structure in pl/sql, PL-SQL Programming

Block Structure

The PL/SQL is a block-structured language. That is, the fundamental units (procedures, anonymous blocks, and functions) that make up a PL/SQL program are logical blocks that can contain any number of nested sub-blocks. Usually, each logical block corresponds to a problem or sub problem to be solved. Hence, PL/SQL supports the divide-and-conquer approach to problem solving known as the stepwise refinement.

A block or sub-block, lets you group logically related to declarations and statements. That way, you can place the declarations close to where they are used. These declarations are local to the block and cease to be present when the block completes.

As the figure shows, a PL/SQL block has three sections: a declarative section, an executable section, and an exception-handling section. (In PL/SQL, a warning or error condition is termed as an exception.) Only the executable section is needed.

The order of the section is logical. First comes the declarative section, in which items can be declared. Once the items are declared, it can be manipulated in the executable section. The Exceptions raised during an execution can be dealt within the exception-handling section.

 

106_block structure.png

Figure: Block Structure

You can nest sub-blocks in the executable and exception-handling sections of a PL/SQL block or subprogram but not in the declarative part. You can also define local subprograms in the declarative section of any block. Though, you can call local subprograms only from the block in which they are defined.

Posted Date: 10/2/2012 1:12:27 AM | Location : United States







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