Bitwise logical and shift operations, Assembly Language

Part A: Bitwise Logical and Shift Operations

Create a SPARC assembly language program that extracts a bit-field from the contents of register %l0. The position of the rightmost bit of the field is indicated in register %l1, and the number of bits in the field is indicated in register %l2. The extracted field should be put into register %l3, right-shifted so that field starts at bit 0; any bits outside of the extracted field should be set to 0. Structure your program so that it operates on 3 separate inputs, each with different input data, field positions, and field widths. Your TA will provide the inputs to work with. Do not hard code any bit masks; your program should create them using the appropriate bitwise operations. Optimize your program, eliminating nop instructions where possible. Do not use m4.

Use printf() to display in hexadecimal the contents of registers %l0, %l1, %l2 before each extraction, and %l3 afterwards. Also run your program in gdb, displaying the contents of registers %l0, %l1, %l2 before each extraction, and %l3 afterwards. Capture the gdb session using script. On a separate piece of paper, show the bit pattern for each hexadecimal number for the registers %l0 and %l3, circling the extracted field.

Part B: Integer Multiplication using Add and Shift Operations

Write a SPARC assembly language program that implements the following integer multiplication algorithm:

negative = multiplier >= 0 ? 0 : 1;

product = 0;

for (i = 0; i < 32; i++) {

if (multiplier & 1)

product += multiplicand;

(product and multiplier registers combined as a unit) >> 1;

}

if (negative)

product -= multiplicand;

Structure your program so that it shows 3 different multiplications: the first should multiply two positive numbers together, the second should multiply a positive number by a negative number, and the third should multiply two negative numbers together. Your TA will provide the input data to work with. Since we don't yet know how to create subroutines, you can simply cut and paste the multiplication code to do each multiplication.

Use printf() to display in hexadecimal the contents of the product, multiplier and multiplicand registers before and after each multiplication. Optimize your program, eliminating nop instructions where possible. Do not use m4. Also run the program in gdb, displaying the contents of key registers as the program executes; you should show that the algorithm is working as expected. Capture the gdb session using script. On a separate piece of paper, show the bit pattern (binary number) for each hexadecimal number, and its decimal equivalent (in other words, show the binary and decimal values of the multiplier, multiplicand, and product).

Other Requirements

Make sure your code is properly formatted into columns, is readable and fully documented, and includes identifying information at the top of each file. You must comment each line of assembly code. Your code should also be well designed: make sure it is well organized, clear, and concise. Your TA will specify the inputs to use for the above two programs.

New Skills Needed for this Assignment:

Use of bitwise logical and shift operations
Use of branching and condition code tests
Understanding of hexadecimal and binary numbers

Posted Date: 3/29/2013 2:49:39 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Bitwise logical and shift operations, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Bitwise logical and shift operations, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Bitwise logical and shift operations Discussions

Write discussion on Bitwise logical and shift operations
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
AAD stand for what??

Entering a Program In this section, we will explain the procedure for entering a small program on IBM PC with DOS operating system. Assume a program of addition of 2 bytes, as

DEC:  Decrement :- The decrement instruction subtracts 1 from the contents of the particular memory location or register. All the conditions code flags except carry flag are affec

how o create the flow chart for scan ROW4, Column 1 and 3.tq

CMPS : Compare String Byte or String Word:-The CMPS instruction may be utilized to compare two strings of Words or byte. The length of the string ought to be stored in the CX. If

The real time System (RTS) : Calling the clock real-time is somewhat of a misnomer because it only shows the time setting it has been given. The RTC is the other half of chip

Declare 1 constant. This can be done just below the prototype section. Put the following divider above the constant section. ;************************ Constants ****************

MOVSW/MOVSB : Move String Word or String Byte: Imagine a string of bytes, stored in a set  of consecutive memory locations is to be moved to another set of  the destination locati

8254 Programmable Timer A diagram of Intel's 8254 interval event/timer counter is given in Figure. The 8254 consists of 3 identical counting circuits, per of which has GATE and

take an integer and its base and the base in which you want to convert the number from user and perform conversion.