Bacterial food poisoning, Biology

Bacterial food poisoning


Food poisoning is an acute gastro-enteritis or intestinal disorder resulting from the ingestion of foods contaminated with either living microorganisms, or their products (toxins) or inorganic chemical substances and poison derived from plants and animals. The condition is characterized by the history of ingestion of common food, attack of many persons at a time and similarity of signs and symptoms in majority of cases.

 
Food poisoning may be bacterial and non-bacterial. The non-bacterial food poisoning is caused by chemicals such as arsenic, certain plant and sea foods. In recent years, there has been a growing concern about contamination of food by chemicals, e.g., fertilizers, pesticides, etc. The bacterial food poisoning is caused by the ingestion of foods contaminated with living bacteria or their products (toxins).

Posted Date: 9/20/2012 3:00:36 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Bacterial food poisoning, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Bacterial food poisoning, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Bacterial food poisoning Discussions

Write discussion on Bacterial food poisoning
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Dominance In each community, a few over topping species are present in greater bulk. By their greater number or biomass (living weight) the dominant species modify the habitat

Determine about the Trichromatic vision Trichromatic vision is the terminology used for normal vision, those who require aU' three primary colours to make a match with an unkno

Q. How is the finding of ribosomes inside mitochondria and chloroplasts explained? It is a strong hypothesis that chloroplasts and mitochondria were prokaryotes that associated

Fatty acid breakdown brings about the oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. The fatty acids are first transformed to their acyl CoA (coenzyme A) derivatives and then degraded by the

Question Write a short note on the following - 1 Plastids 2 Phagocytosis 3 Ribosomal subunits 4 Microfilaments 5 Cell cycle control 6 Tight junctions 7 W

Light Requirement - Seed Dormancy The light requirement for germination of many seeds is presumably a mechanism that prevents the germination of small seeds buried deep underg

Explain Balanus The realised niche of Balanus is the same as its fundamental niche  Lower limits:   as for fundamental niche. Upper  limits: as for fundamental niche

Influence of LV Function :  LV functions, whether normal or impaired is important while selecting a patient for CABG and for long-term results of surgical revascularisation. If le

Which of the following amino acids would you expect to produce a similar sickling effect if placed at position 6? Select all that apply. 1. Arginine 2. Leucine 3. Lysine

Q. What is the vector of Chagas' disease? How is the disease transmitted? The vector of the Chagas' disease is its intermediate host, a triatomine bug. The key species is Triat