What is protocooperation, Biology

Q. What is protocooperation?

The Protocooperation is the ecological interaction in which both participants benefit but which is not obligatory for their survival. The Protocooperation is a harmonious (positive) interspecific ecological interaction. Instance of protocooperation are the action of the spur-winged plover that using its beak eats residuals from crocodile teeth the removal of the ectoparasites from the back of bovines by some birds that eat the parasites the hermit crab that live inside shells over which sea anemones live (these offer protection to the crab and gain mobility to obtain food).

Posted Date: 6/8/2013 6:25:18 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- What is protocooperation, Assignment Help, Ask Question on What is protocooperation, Get Answer, Expert's Help, What is protocooperation Discussions

Write discussion on What is protocooperation
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
State the Definition of respiration Respiration is an act of breathing. (i.e. rise and fall of the chest).  Respiration hastwo parts i.e. inhalation and exhalation. When we bre

Explain Angio-edema Angio-edema:  Swelling of the mucous membranes, tissues beneath the skin or an internal organ because of an allergic reaction.

Q. Dietary Guidelines fur hyperlipidemic patients? • Calories: to maintain ideal body weight. • Carbohydrates should constitute 55-65% of calories with emphasis on • polysacc

Explain Microtube and Hedstorm file removal technique A Hedstorm file was then passed down the length of the tube until it engaged itself tightly between the obstruction an

Hypodermic-Subcutaneous Injection By this route the drug is mainly absorbed into the blood stream by way of the lymphatic drainage. Absorption is slower by this route

ONSE T OF PUBERTY IN FEMALE - Attains at the age of 13 by estrogen hormone. It includes - 1. Growt h of breasts 2. Growth

After the virus capsid containing vimentin gets into the nucleus it is broken down and the DNA is released. Whether capsid proteins are broken down into amino acids or remain intac

Explain Hypertension in biochemical or physiological risk factors? The importance of elevated BP as a risk factor for CAD, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease and renal fail

What are the examples of homeostasis? Regulation of body temperature, control of blood glucose levels, the regulation of salt and water balance are the example of homeostasis

Does natural selection produce an effect directly on genes, on genotypes, or on phenotypes? Explain please.