Intercropping experiments, Advanced Statistics

Intercropping experiments are the experiments including growing two or more crops at same time on the same patch of land. The crops are not required to be planted nor harvested at exactly the same time, but they are generally grown together for a significant part of the growing season. It is used extensively in the tropics and subtropics regions, specifically in developing countries where people are rapidly depleting the scarce resources but are not producing enough food.

Posted Date: 7/28/2012 9:16:13 AM | Location : United States







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