Explain johnson-neyman technique, Advanced Statistics

Johnson-Neyman technique: The technique which can be used in the situations where analysis of the covariance is not valid because of the heterogeneity of slopes. With this method the expected value of the response variable is supposed to be a linear function of the one or the two covariates of interest, but not the same linear function in different subject groups.

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