Explain about the wave-particle duality of light and matter, Physics

Explain about the wave-particle duality of light and matter.

The wave-particle duality of light and matter

Into 1690 year Christiaan Huygens theorized which light was composed of waves, whereas in 1704 Isaac Newton explained which light was made of tiny particles. Experimentations supported each of their theories. Nonetheless, neither a wholly-particle theory nor an entirely-wave theory could describe all of the phenomena connected with light! Therefore scientists began to think of light as both a wave and a particle. Into 1923, Louis de Broglie hypothesized about a material particle could also display wavelike properties, and into 1927 this was demonstrated (through Davisson and Germer) which electrons can indeed behave as waves.

How can a little be both a particle and a wave at similar time? For one thing, this is incorrect to think of light like a stream of particles moving up and down into a wavelike manner. In fact, light and matter exist as particles; what behaves as a wave is the possibility of where that particle will be. The cause light sometimes appears to function as a wave is since we are noticing the accumulation of several of the light particles distributed over the probabilities of where every particle could be.

Posted Date: 9/12/2013 5:10:25 AM | Location : United States







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