Cutaneous respiration in frog, Biology

Cutaneous respiration in frog

  1. Frog belongs to class Amphibia under vertebrates.
  2. It is an amphibious animal which can live both on land and in water.
  3. Skin is very important organ through which one third of the total oxygen is obtained.
  4. When it is in water it respires through skin.
  5. Frog always keeps its skin moist, because it secretes mucous on to the skin (Mucous layer).
  6. The mucous layer retains water and reduces evaporation of water from body.
  7. To keep the skin wet and moist, frogs jump into water very frequently.
  8. Exchange of gases take place through skin.
Posted Date: 8/29/2012 8:45:01 AM | Location : United States







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