Computer-intensive methods, Advanced Statistics

Computer-intensive methods: The statistical methods which require almost identical computations on the data repeated number of times. The term computer intensive is, certainly, a relative quality and often the needs 'intensive' computations might take only a few seconds or minutes on even a small PC. An instance of such an approach is the bootstrap.

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