Cardinal payoffs, Game Theory

 

Cardinal payoffs are numbers representing the outcomes of a game where the numbers represent some continuum of values, such as money, market share or quantity. Cardinal payoffs permit the theorist to vary the intensity or degree of payoffs, unlike ordinal payoffs, in which only the order of values is pivotal. For mixed, payoffs, strategy calculations must be cardinal.

 

Posted Date: 7/21/2012 5:30:15 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Cardinal payoffs, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Cardinal payoffs, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Cardinal payoffs Discussions

Write discussion on Cardinal payoffs
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Consider the Cournot duopoly model in which two rms, 1 and 2, simultaneously choose the quantities they will sell in the market, q 1 and q 2 . The price each receives for each uni

Game 1 Color Coordination (with Delay) This game should be played twice, once without the delay tactic and once with it, to show the difference between out- comes in the s

A Nash equilibrium, named when John Nash, may be a set of methods, one for every player, such that no player has incentive to unilaterally amendment her action. Players are in equi

Treating probability as a logic, Thomas Bayes defined the following: Pr(X|Y)=Pr(Y|X)Pr(X)/Pr(Y) For example, probability that the weather was bad given that our friends playe


In a positive add game, the combined payoffs of all players aren't identical in each outcome of the sport. This differs from constant add (or zero add) games during which all outco

In any game, payoffs are numbers that represent the motivations of players. Payoffs might represent profit, quantity, "utility," or different continuous measures (cardinal payoffs)

A sequential game is {one of|one among|one in all|one amongst|one in each of} excellent data if just one player moves at a time and if every player is aware of each action of the p

A set of colluding bidders. Ring participants agree to rig bids by agreeing not to bid against each other, either by avoiding the auction or by placing phony (phantom) bids.

Something in a very game is Mutual information if all players realize it. A seemingly straightforward concept, mutual information is insufficient to research most games, since it's