Cardinal payoffs, Game Theory

 

Cardinal payoffs are numbers representing the outcomes of a game where the numbers represent some continuum of values, such as money, market share or quantity. Cardinal payoffs permit the theorist to vary the intensity or degree of payoffs, unlike ordinal payoffs, in which only the order of values is pivotal. For mixed, payoffs, strategy calculations must be cardinal.

 

Posted Date: 7/21/2012 5:30:15 AM | Location : United States







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