What is flag, Computer Engineering

Flag is a flip-flop used to kept the information about the status of a processor and the status of the instruction implemented most recently

A software or hardware mark that signals a particular condition or status. A flag is like a switch that can be either on or off. 

 

 

Posted Date: 4/6/2013 5:45:18 AM | Location : United States







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