Weapons of conflict, Managerial Economics

Weapons of Conflict

The trade unions and the employers (or their associations) have many ways of enforcing their demands on each other.   They include:

Strikes:  The strike is the union's ultimate weapon.  It consists of the concerted refusal to work of the members of the union.  It is the strike or the threat of a strike that backs up the union's demand in the bargaining process.

Picket lines:  Are made up of striking workers who parade before the entrance to their plant or firm.  Other union members will not cross a 'picket line'.

The lockout:  Is the employer's equivalent of a strike.  By closing his plant he locks out the workers until such a time the dispute is settled.

Black list:  Is an employers' list of workers who have been discharged for unions' activities and who are not supposed to be given jobs by other employers.

Strike-breakers:  Are workers who are used to operate the business when union members are on strike.

Posted Date: 11/29/2012 5:18:56 AM | Location : United States







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