Suffix substitution closure, Theory of Computation

Our primary concern is to obtain a clear characterization of which languages are recognizable by strictly local automata and which aren't. The view of SL2 automata as generators lets us do this by considering the characteristics of the tilings they build. Consider, for instance the situation in the top half of Figure 5, where there are two tilings u1σv1 and u2σv2 in which the symbol ‘σ' occurs. Clearly, after having built u1σ we had the choice of continuing with either v1 or with v2. We had the same choice after having built u2σ. Hence both of the tilings in the bottom half are constructable as well.

What this means for the strings, is that the question of whether we can extend a particular string to produce a longer string that is in the language depends only on the last symbol of that string.

Posted Date: 3/21/2013 6:09:41 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Suffix substitution closure, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Suffix substitution closure, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Suffix substitution closure Discussions

Write discussion on Suffix substitution closure
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
For every regular language there is a constant n depending only on L such that, for all strings x ∈ L if |x| ≥ n then there are strings u, v and w such that 1. x = uvw, 2. |u

The path function δ : Q × Σ*→ P(Q) is the extension of δ to strings: Again, this just says that to ?nd the set of states reachable by a path labeled w from a state q in an

what problems are tackled under numerical integration

Ask question #Minimum 100 words accepte

So we have that every language that can be constructed from SL languages using Boolean operations and concatenation (that is, every language in LTO) is recognizable but there are r


Paths leading to regions B, C and E are paths which have not yet seen aa. Those leading to region B and E end in a, with those leading to E having seen ba and those leading to B no

We got the class LT by taking the class SL and closing it under Boolean operations. We have observed that LT ⊆ Recog, so certainly any Boolean combination of LT languages will also

Computations are deliberate for processing information. Computability theory was discovered in the 1930s, and extended in the 1950s and 1960s. Its basic ideas have become part of