String diagram, Operation Management

String diagram is a simple tool for analyzing and designing work space such that movement can be minimized. The basic diagram is a scale plan or model on which a thread is used to trace and measure the path of workers. Materials or equipment during a specified sequence of events. It is also common to indicate type of actions being done at each point. This is typically done using the same symbol set that is used in the flow process chart.

String diagram is a simple tool consisting of a scale plan or model on which a thread is used to trace and measure the path of workers, materials or equipment during a specified sequence of events.

Posted Date: 3/25/2013 3:42:23 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- String diagram, Assignment Help, Ask Question on String diagram, Get Answer, Expert's Help, String diagram Discussions

Write discussion on String diagram
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
In the 19th century hospitals had notorious reputations questionable places to visit, risky places to stay. What advances changed all this? a.development of the germ theory of d

Discuss how preferred outcomes are derived in the short run?

Tracing a loop: When a closed loop is to be traced start with the empty cell which is to be evaluated ( or to be included in the solution ). Then moving clockwise draw an arrow fro

What are the roles and responsibilities of the Defense Contract Management Agency

Riverside Oil Company in eastern Kentucky produces 3 different grades of gasoline. They are regular, premium, and supreme grades. Each barrel of regular grade sells for $82 while p

Compare and contrast Deming and Crosbys views on the cost associated with a lost customer.

In a job shop, effective capacity is only 49 percent of design capacity, and actual output is 60 percent of effective output. What design capacity would be needed to achieve an act

Variations in Volume, Variety and Flexibility - Operations Function  A classification which is of particular significance for the various issues considered in this course, re

1. Both Juran and Deming advocated ongoing product development. In fact, Deming's introductory lecture to Japanese managers in 1950 contrasted the old way of product design-desi