Parameter and keyword description - sql cursor, PL-SQL Programming

Parameter and Keyword Description:

SQL:

This SQL is the name of the implicit SQL cursor.

%FOUND:

This attribute results TRUE if an INSERT, DELETE, or UPDATE statement affected one or more rows or a SELECT INTO statement returned one or more rows. Or else, it results FALSE.

%ISOPEN:

This attribute always results FALSE as the Oracle closes the SQL cursor automatically after executing its related SQL statement.

%NOTFOUND:

This attribute is the logical reverse of the %FOUND. It results TRUE if an INSERT, DELETE, or UPDATE statement affect no rows, or the SELECT INTO statement returned no rows. Or else, it results FALSE.

%ROWCOUNT:

This attribute results the number of rows affected by an INSERT, DELETE, or UPDATE statement, or returned by the SELECT INTO statement.

Posted Date: 10/8/2012 8:07:10 AM | Location : United States







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