Multiple correspondence analysis, Applied Statistics

Correspondence analysis is an exploratory technique used to analyze simple two-way and multi-way tables containing measures of correspondence between the rows and colulnns of any given data. The results provide information almost similar to those produced by Factor Analysis techniques, and they allow us to explore the structure of categorical variables included in the table. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) is an extension of simple correspondence analysis to more than two variables. MCA can be used to analyze several contingency tables by generalizing CA.

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