Irregularities, materiality and indication of irregularities, Auditing


Irregularities can be explained as intentional distortions of financial statements for whatever reason and also as misappropriation of possessions whether or not a company by deformation of financial statements. The auditor's duty to fraud and other irregularities is precisely similar as that of errors.


When the auditor knows or suspects that a fault or irregularity has happened or exists, then he cannot apply materiality thought until he has adequate proof of the extent of the fault or irregularity.

Indication of irregularities:

Possible signs of irregularities involve:

  • Misplaced documents or vouchers, these could have been intentionally damaged to hide an irregularity;
  • Proof of altered documents: modifications can occur after the transaction has been accepted;
  • Unsatisfactory description: these are descriptions which are vague and are unproven;
  • Proof of disputes;
  • Existence of anxiety accounts or mysterious differences on reconciliations;
  • Proof that internal control is not operating as it is planned to;
  • Overly lavish life styles of officers and employees;
  • Figures not agreeing with prospects.


Posted Date: 12/3/2012 5:44:00 AM | Location : United States

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