Hubble constant, Physics

Hubble constant; H0 (E.P. Hubble; 1925):

The constant that determines the relationship among the distance to a galaxy and its velocity of recession because of the expansion of the Universe. As the Universe is self-gravitating, it is not constant truly. In cosmology, it is described as

H = (da/dt)/a,

where a refer to the 4-radius of the Universe. While evaluated for the present, it is written

H0 == H(t = now).

The Hubble constant is not known to great correctness (only about a factor of 2), however is supposed to lie somewhere among 50 and 100 km/s/Mpc.

Posted Date: 3/28/2013 3:26:55 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Hubble constant, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Hubble constant, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Hubble constant Discussions

Write discussion on Hubble constant
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
In X-ray tube, when high speed electrons strike the target, they move into the target. They lose their kinetic energy and come to rest inside the solid. The electron because of fin

Attraction & repulsion of atom: It can be observed, that if two negatively charged bodies are brought together, there is a force of repulsion between them. Similarly if two p


The Schottky diodes are a semiconductor diode with a low forward voltage drop and a very fast switching action. The voltage drop at forward biases of around 1ma is in the range 0.1

Q. Illustrate about Optical Memories? In 1983 one of the most successful consumer products of all times was introduced which is compact disk (CD) digital audio system. This CD


Normal 0 false false false EN-IN X-NONE X-NONE

Which statement concerning the electric potential of a solid object made out of a perfectly conducting medium is most correct? Answer: It is the electric field which is z

A beaker of water sits in the sun until it reaches an equilibrium temperature of 30°C. The beaker is made of 100 g of aluminum and contains 170 g of water. In an attempt to cool th

Explain the Energy and Power in Circuits Electrical power dissipated in a circuit or a single circuit element can be calculated using P = I V     where power (P) is in wa