Example for pre-operational stage learning maths, Mathematics

E1) I have a three-year-old friend. He has a lot of toy cars to play with. Playing with him once, I divided the cars into two sets. One set was more spread out and had 14 cars in it. The other set had 15 cars, but they were placed more closely. He had the choice of taking the set with more cars. He made the correct choice. From this, which of the following statements would you deduce? What are the reasons for your choice?

a) He can count upto 20.

b) He can perceptually distinguish between large sets.

c) He just made the choice by chance, and may not be able to repeat it.

d) He may be able to do a lot of things with cars, but not with other objects.

As a child gets older, she moves from an intuitive understanding of number to a level higher than that of recognising numbers by mere perception. A good way of enabling the older among the pre-operational children to make connections, see relationships, and thereby, increase their mathematical understanding, is to involve them in games played with a small number of objects in which they have to 'add' and 'take away' objects.

 

Posted Date: 4/24/2013 2:50:24 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Example for pre-operational stage learning maths, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Example for pre-operational stage learning maths, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Example for pre-operational stage learning maths Discussions

Write discussion on Example for pre-operational stage learning maths
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
solve x+y= 7 and x-y =21

Problem 1 Work through TALPAC 10 Basics (refer to attached handout). Answer the set of questions at the end of tutorial module. Problem 2 Referring to both the haul cyc

The Cartesian product (also called as the cross product) of two sets A and B, shown by AΧB (in the similar order) is the set of all ordered pairs (x, y) such that x€A and y€B. What

Find all the local maximum and minimum values and saddle points of the function f(x, y) = x 2 - xy + y 2 + 9x - 6y + 10

Rules of Integration 1. If 'k' is a constant then ∫Kdx =  kx + c 2. In

performs the mentioned operation and write the answers in standard form. ( -4 + 7 i ) + (5 -10 i ) Solution Actually there isn't much to do here other than add or subt

what is 1/3 + 2/9 equal

In the shape of a cone a tank of water is leaking water at a constant rate of 2 ft 3 /hour .  The base radius of the tank is equal to 5 ft and the height of the tank is 14 ft.

Quadric Surfaces Earlier we have looked at lines and planes in three dimensions (or R 3 ) and when these are used fairly heavily at times in a Calculus class there are several

four times an unknown number is equal to twice the sum of five and that unknown number