Estimate magnitude field-radius-outer radius, Physics

A toroid having a square cross-section, 5.48cm on the side, and an inner radius of 19.4cm 450 turns and carries a current of 1.04A. (It is made up of a square solenoid instead of round one bent into doughnut shape.) What is the magnitude field inside the toroid at (a) the inner radius and (b) the outer radius?

 

Posted Date: 3/22/2013 3:45:04 AM | Location : United States







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