Equivalence problem, Theory of Computation

The Equivalence Problem is the question of whether two languages are equal (in the sense of being the same set of strings). An instance is a pair of ?nite speci?cations of regular languages. We will assume, yet again, that they are given as DFAs.

Theorem The Equivalence Problem for Regular Languages is decidable.

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