Divided entrance duct - aircraft engine, Other Engineering

Divided entrance duct

On a single engine aircraft with fuselage mounted engines, either a wing root inlet or a side scoop inlet may be used. The wing root inlet presents a problem to designers in the forming of the curvature necessary to deliver the air to the engine compressor. The side scoop inlet is placed as far forward of the compressor as possible to approach the straight line effect of the single inlet. Both types suffer faults, in a yaw or turn, a loss of ram pressure occurs on one side of the intake and separated, turbulent boundary layer air is fed to the engine compressor.

 

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Posted Date: 9/11/2012 8:26:02 AM | Location : United States







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