Determine rate of flow, Chemistry

Containers in Illustrations C and D are identical

Each container is 3.25'w x 3.25'w x 8.4'l

Total capacity of each container 88.725 cubic feet

Each container is filled with water @ 70F temperature

Air outside all containers is 70 F temperatures

Valve A is 16" inside diameter; Valve B is 2" inside diameter

Initially valve "A: is closed and valve "B" is open.

Water flow in this exercise is gravity flow only. No external pressure devices are involved

THIS STUDY IS TO DETERMINE RATE OF FLOW at different psi

PROBLEM:

How long will it take to empty container in Illustration C in seconds?

How long will it take to empty container in Illustration D in seconds?

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Posted Date: 3/9/2013 4:19:05 AM | Location : United States







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