Determinants of social demand for education, Microeconomics

Determinants of Social Demand for Education

Certain levels of education like the secondary school and graduate level are considered as having productive value and are attributed with money measures through salary/emolument/wages derivable by the employment market. The salary paid need not be strictly an appropriate money measure of educational levels.

There are other considerations such as the unemployment rates among the  educated, substitutability of labour, discriminatory wage policies, relative marketability of products etc. Keeping aside these reservations, it is noted that expenditure on secondary and higher education is a form of investment. If it is made by private agencies, trusts and corporations it will be private investment. If it is made by the state, it is public investment. There are many institutions of education both at secondary  and higher levels which are initially set up through private enterprise but later brought under state patronage. Such institutions are referred to as private aided institutions in contrast to private unaided or self financing institutions.

Both private aided institutions and the government institutions fall under the umbrella of state subsidies. Several issues arise in regard to the state subsidisation of higher education. Can the expenditure by the state be considered as an investment avenue or a subsidy? If it is an investment then what considerations should weigh uppermost in the state’s calculus on expenditures for higher education? What is the role of the state vis a vis the private enterprise in investments in higher education? Is the state guided by purely economic considerations or by political economy in such investments? How can the state’s participation be optimally maintained in the context of overall objectives of a nation-building effort? Answer to these kinds of questions merit consideration in the context of public investment in education. Prof Richard A. Musgrave identifies three principles which guide public investments in education.

They are:

  1. Equity,
  2. Economies of Scale and
  3. Externalities.
Posted Date: 12/17/2012 4:26:28 AM | Location : United States

Related Discussions:- Determinants of social demand for education, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Determinants of social demand for education, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Determinants of social demand for education Discussions

Write discussion on Determinants of social demand for education
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Why do so many international markets tend towards oligopolist structure? Definition of oligopoly - few and large firms with market power Basic assumptions of oligopoly

During the 1990s, technological advance reduced the cost of computer chips. Explain, with the use supply and demand diagrams, how the following markets are affected in terms of pr

1. Go to the website for MarginalRevolution. Find"> Find two posts that related to microeconomic topics that we are covering and write about on

ELEMENTARY THEORY OF PRICE FORMATION: DEMAND-SUPPLY ANALYSIS: We discuss the elementary theory of price formation. Demand curve in the market is derived from the aggregate con

CHARACTERISTICS OF ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE: Natural monopoly is the situation where the provision of a good or a service has economies of scale, which are realised most when a

Attitude towards Risk: Let's assume the following: The utility function   •  has the single argument "wealth" measured in monetary units,  •  is strictly increasing, and

How to find quantity supplied given just the price

Define the Production Possibilities Curve and explain the basic economics concepts using the PPC. Explain the factors tht shift the PPC outwards

a.  Referring to the table below and using the "Rule of 70," comment on long-term changes in the standard of living in the United States?  b.  Would you rather live in the Unite

when total production fall what,s the status of average product and marginal product