Cursor attributes in pl sql, PL-SQL Programming

Cursor Attributes

 The Cursors and cursor variables have 4 attributes which give you helpful information about the execution of a data manipulation statement.

Syntax:

1586_Cursor Attributes.png

Keyword and Parameter Description:

cursor_name:

These identify an explicit cursor formerly declared within the present scope.

cursor_variable_name:

These identify the PL/SQL cursor variable (or parameter) formerly declared within the present scope.

host_cursor_variable_name:

These identify a cursor variable declared in the PL/SQL host atmosphere and passed to the PL/SQL as a bind variable. The host cursor variable datatype is well-suited with the return type of any PL/SQL cursor variable. The host variables should be prefixed with a colon.

SQL:

These are the name of the implicit SQL cursor.

%FOUND:

This is a cursor attribute that can be appended to the name of the cursor or cursor variable. Previous to the first fetch from an open cursor, the cursor_name%FOUND results NULL. Afterward, it results TRUE if the final fetch returned a row, or FALSE if the final fetch failed to return a row. Until the SQL statement is executed, the SQL%FOUND results NULL. Afterward, it results TRUE if the statement affects any rows, or FALSE if it affects no rows.

%ISOPEN:

This is a cursor attribute that can be appended to the name of the cursor or cursor variable. If a cursor is open, the cursor_name%ISOPEN results TRUE; Or else, it results FALSE. The Oracle automatically closes the implicit SQL cursor after executing its related SQL statement, Therefore the SQL%ISOPEN always results FALSE.

%NOTFOUND:

This is a cursor attribute that can be appended to the name of the cursor or cursor variable. Previous to the first fetch from an open cursor, the cursor_name%NOTFOUND results NULL. Afterward, it results FALSE if the last fetch returned a row, or TRUE if the last fetch unsuccessful to return a row.

Until a SQL statement is executed, the SQL%NOTFOUND results NULL. Afterward, it results FALSE if the statement affects any rows, or TRUE if it affects no rows.

%ROWCOUNT:

This is a cursor attribute that can be appended to the name of the cursor or cursor variable. If a cursor is opened, the %ROWCOUNT is zeroed. Before the first fetch, the cursor_name%ROWCOUNT yields to 0. Afterward, it results the number of rows fetch so far. The number is incremented if the newest fetch returned a row. Until the SQL statement is executed, the SQL%ROWCOUNT results NULL. Afterward, it results the number of rows affected by the statement. The SQL%ROWCOUNT results 0 if the statement affect no rows.

Posted Date: 10/6/2012 9:12:17 AM | Location : United States







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