Creating Views, PL-SQL Programming

Create a view named CustomerAddresses that shows the shipping and billing addresses for each
customer in the MyGuitarShop database.
This view should return these columns from the Customers table: CustomerID, EmailAddress,
LastName and FirstName.
This view should return these columns from the Addresses table: BillLine1, BillLine2, BillCity,
BillState, BillZip, ShipLine1, ShipLine2, ShipCity, ShipState, and ShipZip
Posted Date: 11/29/2014 11:27:30 PM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Creating Views, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Creating Views, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Creating Views Discussions

Write discussion on Creating Views
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Functions   The function is a subprogram that calculates a value. The Functions and procedures are structured similar, except that the functions have a RETURN clause. You can

Definition of CROSS JOIN - SQL Let s = t1 CROSS JOIN t2, where t1 and t2 are table expressions optionally accompanied by range variables. Then: Note: Here T denotes Table

Write an anonymous block that contains a PL/SQL procedure. The procedure takes two input parameter: oldZip and newZip, and it updates the zipcodes table by replacing all oldZip wit

Some Varray Examples In SQL Plus, assume that you define an object type Project, as described below: SQL> CREATE TYPE Project AS OBJECT ( 2 project_no NUMBER(2), 3 title VARCHA

Transaction context As the figure shows, the major transaction shares its context with the nested transactions, but not with the autonomous transactions. Similarly, If one aut

Understanding Varrays The Items of type VARRAY are termed as the varrays. They permit you to relate a single identifier with the whole collection. This relationship lets you man

Example of DELETE - SQL As with UPDATE, a FOR PORTION OF clause can be specified if the target table has a defined period name, as illustrated in Example. Example: Deleting

Find the account numbers of all customers whose balance is more than 10,000 $

Table Literals - SQL One might expect SQL to support table literals in the manner illustrated in Example 2.2, but in fact that is not a legal SQL expression. Example: Not a

Cursor FOR Loops In most cases that need an explicit cursor, you can simplify the coding by using a cursor FOR loop rather of the OPEN, FETCH, and CLOSE statements. A cursor FO