1 coulumb charges, Physics

1 Coulumb Charges:

1 coulumb charge is that amount of charge which when placed 1 m from an identical charge in vacuum which repels it with a force of 8.99 × 109 N.

 

Posted Date: 5/14/2013 1:09:28 AM | Location : United States







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