Y=Theea[sin(inTheeta)+cos(inTheeta)],then find dy÷dTheeta, Mathematics

Y=θ[SIN(INθ)+COS(INθ)],THEN FIND dy÷dθ.

Solution)  Y=θ[SIN(INθ)+COS(INθ)]

applying u.v rule

then dy÷dθ={[ SIN(INθ)+COS(INθ) ] dθ÷dθ }+ {θ[ d÷dθ{SIN(INθ)+COS(INθ) ] }

   => SIN(INθ)+COS(INθ) + θ{ (COS(INθ)÷  θ) - (SIN(INθ)÷θ) }

   θ is canceled and  sin(ln θ ) is also canceled  then u will get
   =>  2COS(INθ)

Posted Date: 3/11/2013 12:56:54 AM | Location : United States





y=Θ[sin(lnΘ)+cos(lnΘ)]

dy/dΘ=[sin(lnΘ)+cos(lnΘ)] + Θ[cos(lnΘ)-sin(lnΘ)]*1/Θ ---->(Use Multiplication rule)

dy/dΘ=2cosΘ.

Posted by | Posted Date: 3/11/2013 12:59:09 AM


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