What is the mass flow rate of the cooling water, Physics

Air enters in a compressor operating at steady state along with a volumetric flow rate of 37 m³/min at 136 kPa, 305 K and exits with a pressure of 680 pPa and a exact volume of 0.1686 m³/kg. The work input to the compressor is 161.5 kJ per kg of air flowing. Energy transfer from the air to cooling water circulating in a water jacket that is enclosing the compressor results in a raise in the temperature of the cooling water of 11ºcwith no change in pressure. Neglecting heat transfer from the outside of the jacket also all the kinetic and potential energy effects, what is the mass flow rate of the cooling water, in kg/min?

Posted Date: 3/20/2013 2:49:34 AM | Location : United States







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