What do you mean by wound closure, Biology

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Q. What do you mean by Wound closure?

Generally the incisions designed for minimal exposure such as the H - shaped incision, do not require suturing, as the abutment and the transitional restoration occlude the opening. On rare occasions, when attached tissue has been re-positioned, fine labial sutures (6-0) may be used in order to close any incision lines.

Full - thickness flaps should be closed using appropriate sutures (usually 3-0). The pedicle flaps created by the S-shaped incisions require finer sutures (4-0 to 6-0) to create the papillary form, which will be supported by the transitional restoration. Sliding flaps from the palate require stronger sutures (usually 3-0) and may be secured by tying them to the abutments. Supplementary dressings (such as periodontal pack) may be used when tissues are denuded. However, this should be avoided.


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