Vesicular exanthema, Biology

Vesicular exanthema
Vesicular exanthema of pigs closely resembles foot-and-mouth disease in these animals. The virus causing the disease belongs to the genus Calicivirus in the family Caliciviridae. The disease is not communicable to cattle and at present this is the only factor which distinguishes it from the foot-and-mouth disease. The disease is extinct in swine now, although the virus is present in marine mammals. It is not reported in India.

Posted Date: 9/18/2012 7:20:32 AM | Location : United States

Related Discussions:- Vesicular exanthema, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Vesicular exanthema, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Vesicular exanthema Discussions

Write discussion on Vesicular exanthema
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Which of the following is not a type of mass movement that results from the force of gravity? A. Landslide B. Creep C. Deflation D. Mudflow

Epimorphic Regeneration In this sort of regeneration the lost part is reformed and restored via the growth of a bud or blastema from the remaining part of the organism followe

What are universal donors and universal recipients concerning the ABO blood system? Universals donors of the ABO blood type system are the individuals of the type O. Type O blo

what is primitive fungi?

The goals of biological classification The world of animal diversity is quite complex and it requires an ability to recognise similarities and differences among organisms. Class

Soil – plant – animal relationship The plants derive the minerals from soil, and the animals from the plants / feed they consume and there is a dependent interrelationship bet

Structure of the Vascular System The layers of the vascular system are all similar in veins and ateries. The difference of thickness of various layers constitute the functio

how to identify in contaminants and aldultrants in pure ingredients

What happens if platelets aren''t present in blood?

GROWTH CURVE - Sigmoid curve or stretched 'S' shaped curve is obtained showing - a - lag phase                              b - log phase c - in flaxion p