Unity of command, Financial Management

Unity of Command

Unity of command is the principle in which each subordinate should be responsible to only one manager.

Posted Date: 10/16/2012 6:50:11 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Unity of command, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Unity of command, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Unity of command Discussions

Write discussion on Unity of command
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Treasury Notes or T-notes are the securities issued with maturities of more than one year and but not more than 10 years. All these securities are coupon securiti

Difference between mortgage bond and a debenture? A mortgage bond is a secured bond whereas a debenture is an unsecured bond.

Flying High Inc. plans to raise $5,000,000 external financing through issuing bonds, and is considering two options: regular bonds and zero couple bonds.  The regular bonds will ha

Examine about the Risk-based auditing A risk based audit will be reviewing the risk management process and considering main risks of the organisation as a whole. Risk manage

What is accumulated depreciation? Depreciation is the allocation of an initial cost over time of asset. Whereas the term accumulated depreciation is the total of all the deprec

Prepare a capital budget analysis of the following data, your analysis should determine WACC, Net Operating Cash Flow, NPV, IRR, PI, and Payback analysis. This analysis is for t

Q. What do you know about sinking funds? sinking funds : quite often, one may be interested to accumulate a target amount over a given period inclusive of interest for the peri

Your broker calls to offer you the investment opportunity of a lifetime, the chance to invest in mortgage-backed securities. The broker explains that these securities are entitled

What is the decision rule for accepting or rejecting proposed projects while using net present value? While using the net present value decision rule any project along with a net

You deposit $3,000 in a back account that pays 10% annually, how much would you have im your account after 5 years?