Theories of evolution of man, Science

Theories of evolution of man

Towards the beginning of  the nineteenth century, scientists had already started doubting the theory of  special creation and various attempts were made to explain how different life forms could have evolved. Lamarck, a French naturalist, for instance, believed that all living things adapted to their environment, by  using and developing their organs and characteristics that suit their environment best. If environment changed, their organs too changed accordingly to suit the needs and these changes were passed on from one generation to another. 

Accordingly, as the giraffe lived in an environment of high trees and had to stretch its neck  to eat the leaves, its neck became long and this trait was inherited by its descendants. This theory has won little support with the scientists. As we can see, there is no evidence that a dog trained to do  certain things would pass on the ability to  the next generation, or a scientist's skill is passed on to his children.  

Posted Date: 9/28/2012 3:29:11 AM | Location : United States







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