Syngamy - patterns of sexual reproduction, Biology

Syngamy - Patterns of Sexual Reproduction

Sperm fuses with the egg. This results in both the union of the paternal nucleus with the maternal one (karyogamy), as well as the fusion of the cytoplasms of the two gametes (plasmogamy). Syngamy leads to fertilisation producing a zygote which develops into new individuals, depending upon the size and shape of the gametes involved, syngamy can be subdivided into three types.

i) Isogamy: The gametes are morphologically similar although they may differ in their physiological and biochemical properties. For example, the gametes produced from the male and female gametocytes of Monocystis.

ii) Anisogamy: The gametes differ in size and structure and are collectively known as anisogametes. Of these, the smaller ones are usually more numerous and motile. They are called the male gametes (or the micro-gametes as in protozoans and the sperms as in metazoans). The fusion of micro - and macro-gametes is known as anisogamy. It is frequently found in protozoans as in Plasmodium and Vorticella. In higher phyla the term fertilisation is used instead of anisogamy.

iii) Oogamy: In oogamy one gametes type is always motile and usually small (the sperm) and the other is always nonmotile and large (the egg). All metazoans exhibit oogamy. The eggs of most fully terrestrial non-chordates such as insects have shelled eggs. The shell bears a minute pore (micropyle) for allowing the entry of sperms for fertilization.

Posted Date: 2/5/2013 1:02:56 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Syngamy - patterns of sexual reproduction, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Syngamy - patterns of sexual reproduction, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Syngamy - patterns of sexual reproduction Discussions

Write discussion on Syngamy - patterns of sexual reproduction
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
Question 1: Describe the need for Harmonization in clinical trials? Brief on the Revised ICH terms of reference and explain the structure of ICH? Need for Harmonization i

detail about cytoplas

PITUITARY DISORDERS - (a) Pituitary Dwarfism . It is caused by the deficiency of growth hormones (GH) from childhood. It is characterised by small but well porportioned body a

Difference between Blind Spot and Yellow Spot - Blind Spot Y ellow spot 1. It lies litte away from yellow spot.   2. No pi

Q. What are the major parts of the human ear? The human ear is divided into three major parts: the external ear, the internal ear and the middle ear.

Define the Role of Vitamin D in the immune system? Immune responses that are, mediated by T-cells can be inhibited by tile large doses of calcitriol i.e. 1, 25 dihydroxycholec

what is animal kingdom and what are its functions

Discuss the importance of septa in maxillary sinus during a sinus lift or graft surgery. Septa, when present in the maxillary sinus will divide it into sections creating separa


Morphogenetic Movements Gastrulation is a dynamic process including a variety of coordinated movements of cells of dissimilar areas of the blastula. The movements of cells in