Structure of the vascular system, Biology

Structure of the Vascular System

The layers of the vascular system are all similar in veins and ateries. The difference of thickness of various layers constitute the functional differences in the two types of vessels.

Tunica Intima

A single-cell endothelial layer that provides friction free lining for blood flow.

Tunica Media

This is a smooth muscle middle layer that controls the diameter of the blood vessel. 

Tunica Adventitia

This is the outer layer which consists of fibrous connective tissues. Nerve fibers present in this layer, causing constriction and dilation.

Posted Date: 10/30/2012 6:04:13 AM | Location : United States

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