Strictly local languages, Theory of Computation

We have now de?ned classes of k-local languages for all k ≥ 2. Together, these classes form the Strictly Local Languages in general.

De?nition (Strictly Local Languages) A language L is strictly local (L ∈ SL) iff it is strictly k-local for some k.

 

Again, we can generalize the work we have done so far to establish properties of the class of strictly local languages as a whole.

Theorem 3 ((General) Suffix Substitution Closure) A language L is strictly local iff there is some k such that, for all strings u1, v1, u2, and v2 in Σ* and all strings x in Σk-1 :

u1xv1 ∈ L and u2xv2 ∈ L ⇒ u1xv2 ∈ L.

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