Social cost of monopoly, Microeconomics

Price Discrimination: occurs when the same product is sold at different prices to different consumers. A monopolist divided his consumers into groups and sells his product at varying prices to them. Price discrimination is applied in order to increase the profits earned. Some consumers are willing to pay more for a commodity. The monopolist recognizes this fact and charges them a higher price. This enables him to earn a greater profit than he would have got by charging a common price.

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