Secondary succession - community change, Biology

Secondary Succession - Community Change

Secondary succession is the sequential development of biotic communities after the complete or partial destruction of the existing community. A mature or intermediate community may be destroyed by natural events such as floods, droughts, fires, or storms or by human interventions such as deforestation, agriculture, overgrazing, etc. Let us look briefly at an example of secondary succession occurring on an abandoned agricultural farm where soil has been already formed before cultivation started.

Posted Date: 1/19/2013 8:12:32 AM | Location : United States







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