Science as a human endeavour, Biology

Science as a human endeavour:

Science is a human endeavour. Human beings, from prehistoric times, attempted to control nature for their own welfare. For this, they had to observe and understand nature. Out of such an understanding, they found the means to make nature yield goods according to their needs. While this understanding led to useful applications, it also opened up further questions and avenues of enquiry, enriching the stock of knowledge. And this. in turn, led to improved techniques for satisfying their needs. This process of understanding nature and using that understanding to control nature, is what may be called "science". The process is certainly not without ups and downs. The story of the ups and downs in science, as it grew in society, is very interesting. As we have said earlier, in this block we shall relate this story. But surely, by now, you may be wondering why you should know the history of science. And, for that matter, you may ask, what do we mean by the 'history' of science? Will it mean memorising a lot of dates, names and places? Well, in the first unit we'll provide you with the answers to these questions. We will also discuss, in brief, some aspects of science in the present-day society.


The roots of science, as we know it today, lie in the life of primitive human beings. Therefore, in the next unit, we shall start the story of science right from the beginning, that is, from the dawn of human society. We shall see how the transition from a primitive society
to an agricultural society had led to the birth of science and how it grew in the ancient world.

Posted Date: 9/27/2012 6:53:13 AM | Location : United States







Related Discussions:- Science as a human endeavour, Assignment Help, Ask Question on Science as a human endeavour, Get Answer, Expert's Help, Science as a human endeavour Discussions

Write discussion on Science as a human endeavour
Your posts are moderated
Related Questions
N a ture of viruses Viruses vary in their size ranging from 20 nm (200 Ao) to 350 nm (3,500 Ao) and in shapes from spherical to bullet, rod, brick or filamentous forms. Some

To study the conditions essential for the germination of seeds:- In the diagram below a having seeds on cotton wool with air, warmth, but no water; b has water, warmth, but no

Write an essay on cytological approach in taxonomy.

Q. Which are the subproducts of the photochemical phase that are essential for the chemical stage of photosynthesis? The chemical stage of photosynthesis depends on ATP and NAD

Conventional CABG on Cardiopulmonary Bypass   Chest is opened by midline incision and median sternotomy. Simultaneously saphenous vein or radial artery is harvested. 'T

How do you determine net atp production after complete oxidation to CO2 and H2O using mitochondrial ?-oxidation, the TCA cycle, the mitochondrial electron transport chain and oxida

Explain Operational Taxonomic Units - Numerical Taxonomy 1) Then the characters to be used for studying the OTUs are selected. Usually a large number of characters are taken as

Q. What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is the disease caused by action or deficient production of insulin and the consequent high blood glucose level and low glucose u

Define Transport and Storage of Iron? You have seen that transferrin binds both newly absorbed iron and iron released after degradation of haemoglobin. Transferrin is a glycopr

Kingdom Protista The protistans are a complex and diverse group of organisms that are placed together simply because they are all single celled eukaryotes but some form rather sp